Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)

Opportunity for Skilled Professionals to Get Canadian Citizenship

Overview of Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)

What is a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)?

Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) are mini-immigration programs that allow a province or territory in Canada to nominate prospective immigrants to become permanent residents, Every province and territory has a PNP, with the exception of Quebec and the remote (and extremely cold!) territory of Nunavut. 

 

PNPs are designed to help provinces attract immigrants who fill a need specific to that region. For example, if a province had a shortage of nurses, they might prioritize bringing in nurses through their PNP. 

 

A province cannot grant permanent resident status on its own. In Canada, permanent resident status can only be approved by the federal government. PNPs are a way for the provinces to recommend people for PR status, but once you receive a nomination, you still have to apply for PR at the federal level. 

A province cannot grant permanent resident status on its own. In Canada, permanent resident status can only be approved by the federal government. PNPs are a way for the provinces to recommend people for PR status, but once you receive a nomination, you still have to apply for PR at the federal level.

Express Entry and PNPs

There are two types of PNP’s Express Entry-aligned PNPs (also called ‘enhanced’ PNPs) and non-Express Entry-aligned PNPs (also called ‘base’ PNPs).

 

The difference between these two types of PNPs is that you need to have an active profile in the Express Entry pool in order to be considered for an Express Entry-aligned PNP. For PNPs that are aligned with Express Entry, successfully receiving a nomination from the province will give a person 600 points added to their CRS score, virtually guaranteeing an invitation to apply.

 

If a person is not eligible for Express Entry, but qualifies for a non-Express Entry-aligned PNP, they might be able to apply for permanent resident status through that PNP. But, this requires a different type of application. Non-Express Entry-aligned PNPs require applications for permanent residence to be submitted in paper-based, hard copy and by mail. Processing times for non-Express Entry applications are also much longer than Express Entry processing times.

Categories of PNPs

Each province operates multiple PNP streams. At any given time, there are approximately 80 active PNP Streams in Canada. There are a few common categories of PNPs:

  • In-Demand Occupation: These PNPs require you to have experience in an occupation that’s in-demand in the province. One popular example is the Saskatchewan Express Entry stream.
  • Job Offer: These PNPs require you to have a job offer from an employer in the province.
  • Past work or study: Require you to have previously worked or studied in the province.
  • Entrepreneurial: Require you to have business management and investing capabilities.

These are just a few of the most common categories of PNP streams, but there are many streams out there, each with its own unique criteria.

FAQs

It is an ideal program for the skilled workers with foreign work experience who wants  to immigrate to Canada permanently.

There are some minimum requirements which need to be met in order to be eligible for this program.   The minimum requirements pertains  to skilled work experience, language ability and education.   

One must meet all the requirements to be eligible for this program. The application is assessed based on the age, education, work experience, whether you have a valid job offer, language skills on English and French and adaptability which means how well you’re likely to settle in Canada. Following factors are a part of 100 point grid which is used to access your eligibility.

The minimum point’s requirement is 67.

By skilled work experience we mean that you’ve worked in 1 of these National Occupational Classification (NOC) job groups: Managerial jobs, Professional jobs and Technical jobs and skilled trades.  One must be able to show that one has performed the duties which are set out in the lead statement of the occupational description in the NOC.

By skilled work experience we mean that it must be in the same type of job which you want to use for your immigration purposes. It has to be within last ten years, only the experience where you have been paid for your work will be counted. Experience as a volunteer or internship won’t be counted.  

One can take approved tests in English or French for: writing, reading, listening or speaking. A minimum score of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) is 7 in all 4 abilities makes you eligible. The language tests results must be valid for 2 years after the date of the test result. They must be valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.

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